Rheinsberg is a small town in the north of Berlin. It’s embedded in the Ruppiner Land surrounded by lakes, forests and history. The centrepiece and main reason for most visitors to come is the Frederician Rococco castle and its lush gardens, the castle of Rheinsberg.

The story of Rheinsberg tells much more about Germany than one would think.

Day Trip from Berlin: Rheinsberg’s Castle

Rheinsberg

Rheinsberg is a cute town located at Grienericksee, where you can rent boats to explore town and castle from the lakeside.

Day Trip from Berlin: Rheinsberg’s CastleDay Trip from Berlin: Rheinsberg’s Castle

Castle of Rheinsberg

Rheinsberg is the former residency of the crown prince Friedrich II. and prince Heinrich. Friedrich II. had a big impact on the Prussian architecture during his reign, which is why it’s called Frederician Rococco. Significant therefor is the combination of Dutch and French style, not only in architecture, but also in art.
The towers have a significant conical roof, which they got in 1803. Prince Ferdinand reconstructed some parts to his own liking.
Further you find a Kurt Tucholsky Literature Museum, showcasing life and influences of the German author. The staff advises you to touch and read everything. “Try to experience and learn as much as possible.”

Castle Garden

The garden spans over 26 hectare and is surrounded by a lake. Visitors need to take bridges to navigate through the area.
In the palace grounds you find sculptures and green arcs, geometric places and vast meadows; a pleasure garden, grotto, an orangery and an open-air theatre.
There’s also a big obelisk to remember the Seven Years’ War. The monument is surrounded by greens.

The view from the garden isn’t bad either, different shades of green or the castle in its full extend.

Actually, I had more fun exploring the garden than the castle.

History of the Palace

Originally, Rheinsberg used to be a moated castle.

In the early 18th century Friedrich Wilhelm I. bought the castle for his son. He partly remodelled it and changed it to a three winged complex.
A few years later prince Heinrich moved in and he barely changed anything except for the pavilion in the garden.

Later, prince August didn’t have a male heir so the possession went to the Prussian royalty up until 1945.

Shortly after World War 2, Rheinsberg was used as a children’s home.
In the early 50s the German Democratic Republic turned the castle into a sanatorium.

After the German-German reunion, Rheinsberg was turned into a museum and is now part of the Prussian foundation for castles and gardens in the area.

Day Trip from Berlin: Rheinsberg’s Castle

Did you know?

Over the years many writers came and got inspired to write. This way the place became more popular and tourism rose.

There’s even a book called “Rheinsberg. A Storybook for Lovers” (Rheinsberg: Ein Bilderbuch für Verliebte), telling the story of an unmarried couple visiting the castle. The story was progressive at this time.

Information

Admission: 8 Euro
How to get there: RE from Berlin Central Station, check the timetable
Opening hours:
(Summer) Tue – Sun 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
(Winter) Tue – Sun 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

There’re many concerts throughout the year.

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Day Trip from Berlin: Rheinsberg’s Castle